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Medical Terminology Daily (MTD) is a blog sponsored by Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc. as a service to the medical community, medical students, and the medical industry. We will post a workweek daily medical or surgical term, its meaning and usage, as well as biographical notes on anatomists, surgeons, and researchers through the ages. Be warned that some of the images used depict human anatomical specimens.

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A Moment in History

Antoine Louis
(1723–1792)

French surgeon, anatomist, and physiologist. Following his medical studies and a long career as a physiologist, Antoine Louis was named Permanent Secretary of the Royal French Academy of Surgery. His other titles were those of Professor of the Royal Academy, Consultant Surgeon of the Armies of the King, member of the Royal Society of Sciences of Montpellier, Inspector of the Royal Military Hospitals, and Doctor in Law of the University of Paris. As a member of these academies Louis was instrumental in the design and construction of the guillotine. Initially called the "Louisette", this device was later named after another French physician in the same committee, Dr. Joseph-Ignace Guillotin.

Antoine Louis' name is better know to history as the eponymic origin of the "sternal angle" also know as the "Angle of Louis" and synonymously (probably by misspelling or translation) the "angle of Lewis", and "angle of Ludwig". This anatomical landmark is extremely important as it serves as a superficial landmark for important anatomical occurrences (click here).

As a point of controversy, there are some that contest the history of this eponym adjudicating it to Pierre Charles Alexander Louis (1787-1872), another French physician dedicated to the study of tuberculosis.

Sources:
1. Srickland, N; Strickland A Angle of Louis, More Than Meets the Eye. MedTalks:
2. Ramana, R. K., Sanagala, T. and Lichtenberg, R. (2006), A New Angle on the Angle of Louis. Congestive Heart Failure, 12: 197–199
3
. "The origin of Medical Terms" Skinner, HA; 1970


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Dr. Maurits Biesbrouck

Dr. Maurits Biesbrouck was born in Roeselare (Belgium) on February 15th, 1946, studied medicine at the Catholic University Leuven and became a MD in 1972. He devoted his professional career to clinical pathology (City Hospital Roeselare) and transfusion medicine He became adjunct medical director of the Dienst voor het Bloed (Brussels) and was the president-founder of the Scientific Association Transfusion in Flanders (WVTV).

Having a lifelong interest in Andreas Vesalius he translated the first book of the De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem into Dutch, compiled an annually updated Vesalius-bibliography and wrote many articles on his life and works, many as a co-author with Omer Steeno (Leuven, Belgium) and Theodoor Goddeeris (Kortrijk, Belgium). For the moment he is working on an overview of the editions of Vesalius’s works. See www.andreasvesalius.be.

Thanks to Dr. Bisbrouck for collaborating with "Medical Terminology Daily" with the article "Andreas Vesalius' Fatal Voyage to Jerusalem", a 2016 updated version of an original presentation at the 2014 Vesalius Continuum Meeting in Zakynthos, Greece.

He was part of the research team that uncovered the "false Vesalius postage stamps".

Maurits Biesbrouck, MD.