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Medical Terminology Daily (MTD) is a blog sponsored by Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc. as a service to the medical community, medical students, and the medical industry. We will post a workweek daily medical or surgical term, its meaning and usage, as well as biographical notes on anatomists, surgeons, and researchers through the ages. Be warned that some of the images used depict human anatomical specimens.

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A Moment in History

Antoine Louis
(1723–1792)

French surgeon, anatomist, and physiologist. Following his medical studies and a long career as a physiologist, Antoine Louis was named Permanent Secretary of the Royal French Academy of Surgery. His other titles were those of Professor of the Royal Academy, Consultant Surgeon of the Armies of the King, member of the Royal Society of Sciences of Montpellier, Inspector of the Royal Military Hospitals, and Doctor in Law of the University of Paris. As a member of these academies Louis was instrumental in the design and construction of the guillotine. Initially called the "Louisette", this device was later named after another French physician in the same committee, Dr. Joseph-Ignace Guillotin.

Antoine Louis' name is better know to history as the eponymic origin of the "sternal angle" also know as the "Angle of Louis" and synonymously (probably by misspelling or translation) the "angle of Lewis", and "angle of Ludwig". This anatomical landmark is extremely important as it serves as a superficial landmark for important anatomical occurrences (click here).

As a point of controversy, there are some that contest the history of this eponym adjudicating it to Pierre Charles Alexander Louis (1787-1872), another French physician dedicated to the study of tuberculosis.

Sources:
1. Srickland, N; Strickland A Angle of Louis, More Than Meets the Eye. MedTalks:
2. Ramana, R. K., Sanagala, T. and Lichtenberg, R. (2006), A New Angle on the Angle of Louis. Congestive Heart Failure, 12: 197–199
3
. "The origin of Medical Terms" Skinner, HA; 1970


 "Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc., and the contributors of "Medical Terminology Daily" wish to thank all individuals who donate their bodies and tissues for the advancement of education and research”.

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In Search of Andreas Vesalius The Quest for the Grave, Lost and not yet found

My partner in crime and fellow traveler, Theo Dirix, has just published a new account of our common quest for the lost grave of Andreas Vesalius. Until the scientific results of our latest mission in Zakynthos in September 2017, will become public, this collection of articles published since 2014 represents a detailed and complete status quaestionis of a search that will never be the same anymore.


I'm proud and grateful to be part of a team he describes a most tenacious.

Following is a remarkable quote from the book: "The beast you have in your hands may appear as aged and stubborn: indeed, the texts collected here are not new and they regularly echo each other. The beast barks and growls: these words do not intend to examine or research but were meant to sell a project to potential sponsors. I feel the taste of the creature’s spit in my face, but pleading not guilty to any accusation of self-glorification, I do hope I managed to teach it a few tricks you will enjoy. While continuing to write about Vesalius’s death and his grave, black dogs may still be scratching at my hermitage. When I will finally throw open the doors to the beauty beyond, here’s hoping the encounter with the female spider will taste as fresh as a first kiss and be the beginning of something else."

No surprise some have described the book as: "a truly captivating story (a Live Adventure!) written in a fascinating, passionate and inspiring way. Theo Dirix, with his unique style is describing facts from his adventure to locate the grave of Vesalius and he is mentioning with great respect all his collaborators, the friends of Vesalius and those who share the same passion for Anatomy and Art." (Vasia Hatzi on Med in Art).

Cover of the book by Theo Dirix
Cover of the book by Theo Dirix.
Click on the image for a larger depiction

The book can be ordered here: https://www.shopmybooks.com/US/en/book/theo-dirix-32/in-search-of-andreas-vesalius. (English version of the website). More information about the author on his website www.theodirix.com. or here.


Personal note: Thanks to Pascale Pollier, a contributor to this website, for allowing us to publish this article, originally published on Vesalius Continuum.

I received a personalized copy from the author, Theo Dirix; Thank you very much for the recognition and the use of this website as reference in some of your comments. It is a great read for anyone even mildly interested in the life and specially the death and disappearance of the grave of Andreas Vesalius. There are several passages in the book that I will have to research and transform in articles for this blog.

For those who collaborated in the GoFundMe campaign because or our article entitled Do you want your name in a book? The Quest for the Lost Grave.... this is the book and the name of all the contributors are listed in it! 

The quest continues... Dr. Miranda