10 medical words that are used incorrectly

1. In the heart, heart valve, and ring valvuloplasty arena, everybody talks about the “anulus”, but most everybody misspells it! The word anulus originates from the Latin term “anulus” meaning “ring”. The proper way of writing it is ANULUS not ANNULUS, with a double "n"

2. The word “process” is English, therefore its plural form should be pronounce as “processes” not with a Latinized inflection as “processiiis”

3. The inflammation of a tendon is “tendonitis”, not “tendinitis”

4. When there is an excess amount of fluid in the pericardium that interferes with cardiac function, that is called a cardiac “tamponade”, not a “tamponaade” (with a French accent) and please don’t call it a “tapenade” (I have heard it), a dish consisting of puréed or finely chopped olives, capers, anchovies and olive oil!

5. The singular form for “criteria” is “criterium”. The following is wrong:  “only one criteria was used to make the decision”. The proper sentence should be "only one criterium was used to make the decision".

6. When using a scope to examine the fundus of the uterus, the procedure is a funduscopic procedure, not fundoscopic! It is more euphonic, I will agree, but not correct!

7. In spinal anatomy, the term “a facet joint” is most commonly used, but the term should be pronounced with the accent on the first syllable as in “fácet”! And just to be a bit more correct, the proper term for a so-called “facet joint” is “zygapophyseal joint”

8. In colon pathology a “diverticulum” is an outpouching of the colon wall. The plural form for “diverticulum” is diverticula.  The terms diverticulae of diverticuli are not correct

9. The terms centigrade and centimeter are derivate from the Latin word “centus”, meaning “one hundred” therefore the “French-like pronunciation of centimeter and centigrade with a French twist, with a nasal initial "a" although cool, is not correct!

10. An finally, my pet peeve: The words “anatomy” and “dissection” are actually synonymous.  Anatomy has a Greek origin. Ana means “apart” and “otomy” is the “process of cutting”: “to cut apart”  Dissection has a Latin origin and means exactly the same! In fact, for many years the term “to anatomize” was used instead of “to dissect”!

Where is the problem? In the pronunciation! “Dissection” should rhyme with “dissent”. For a complete article on this topic, click here.

Sources:
1. “"The Doctor’s Dyslexicon: 101 pitfalls in medical language" John H. Dirckx The American Journal of Dermatopathology. 27(1):86-88, FEBRUARY 2005 DOI: 10.1097/01.dad.0000148282.96494.0f PMID: 15677983