Sponsor   

Medical Terminology Daily (MTD) is a blog sponsored by Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc. as a service to the medical community, medical students, and the medical industry. We post anatomical, medical or surgical terms, their meaning and usage, as well as biographical notes on anatomists, surgeons, and researchers through the ages. Be warned that some of the images used depict human anatomical specimens.

Click on the link below to subscribe to the MTD newsletter. If you think an article could be interesting to somebody else, feel free to forward the link of the article. Should you want to use the information on the article, please follow the CAA, Inc Privacy and Security Statement found at the bottom of this page. 

You are welcome to submit questions and suggestions using our "Contact Us" form. The information on this blog follows the terms on our "Privacy and Security Statement"  and cannot be construed as medical guidance or instructions for treatment. 


We have 109 guests online


A Moment in History 

Martin Naboth, title page of De Sterelitate Mulierum 

Martin Naboth
(1675 – 1721)

Not much is known about this German physician and anatomist. He was born in 1675 in Calau, a town in Southern Brandenburg, Germany. He studied medicine at the University in Leipzig, receiving his doctorate in Philosophy in 1701 and his MD in 1703. Although his interests were based in chemistry, Naboth became an avid anatomist, with interest in the anatomy of the female reproductive system.

His main publication in 1707 was “De Sterilitate Mulierum” (On Sterility in Women). In this book he refers to small pearl-like transparent structures found in the uterine cervix. Believing that he had discovered the way women store eggs, he called these “ovarium novum” (new ovaries). His discovery was accepted by many and these structures came to be known as “Ovula Nabothii “. Only later were to understand these structures as cysts created by clogging of the opening of the glands found around the uterine cervix. These mucus-producing glands are known as the [cervical glands] and also as Nabothian glands. These cysts, which are common and do not represent a sign of cervical cancer, are known today as Nabothian cysts.

Naboth had only rediscovered these cysts first described in 1681 by Guillaume des Noues (1650 – 1735), although the eponym records Naboth’s name.

Naboth died in Leipzig in 1721 leaving a large anatomical collection. We have not been able to find an image of Naboth, so we are depicting the title page of his 1707 “De Sterilitate Mulierum”. If you click on the image you can see a larger depiction.

Sources
1. “Histoire de la M?decine, depuis son origine jusqu'au dix-neuvi?me si?cle” A. J. L. Jourdan ; E. F. M. Bosquillon  1815
2. “The Origin of Medical Terms” Skinner HA 1970 Hafner Publishing Co.


 "Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc., and the contributors of "Medical Terminology Daily" wish to thank all individuals who donate their bodies and tissues for the advancement of education and research”.

Click here for more information


Rare & Collectible Books at AbeBooks.com

bookplateink.com


 

MTD Articles Guidelines

"Medical Terminology Daily" Articles Guidelines

The objective of MTD is to provide the medical community, medical industry, and public in general with a daily, short write-up of reliable information regarding a medical term (or portion of a term), anatomical structure, organ, bodily system, basic surgical procedural information, and other medical/surgical information that we consider interesting to share. We also have a sidebar called “A Moment in History” where we honor those who have contributed to the growth of medical knowledge in the areas of anatomy, medicine, surgery, and medical research.

To the public in general:

The group of contributors to Medical Terminology Daily (MTD) has been formed by invitation only. We welcome your suggestion of words or terms of interest to you, but do not send write-ups because they will not be published. Our policies especifically state that we do not provide medical counseling, so questions and comments requesting so will be disregarded.

To our invited contributors

An invited contributor does not pay sponsorship for any of their articles or personal page. This page shows the basic article guidelines for this website. A detailed style manual will be available to the contributor once they receive access to our submission system.

Sponsorship of MTD articles

We allow the sponsorship of articles in MTD by medical companies and individuals by request. We reserve the right to approve or reject these requests. All posts will be reviewed for accuracy, must be professional in their wording and content, and follow the article guidelines. All links in each sponsored article will be reviewed to make sure that they comply with our policies and procedures, as well with our guidelines. To request a sponsored word, article, or "Moment in History" please contact our webmaster through the "Contact Us" form.

Article Guidelines

Title: As a title, each article can have a single word: sphenoid, sternum , ectopic, pancreas, flexion, etc.; part of a word: -oid, ectomy, -lapar-, -rect-, etc.; opposing terms:  kyphosis/lordosis, anterior/posterior, etc.; If a multiple word is required, they must refer to one item or procedure: triangle of "doom", atrial fibrillation, sternal angle, Billroth I procedure, etc.

Content: The content should be descriptive, simple, and short. In general, we should try to limit the length of the body of the article to 400 words maximum.

Originality: Because of copyright issues, the article should be original. When based on information obtained in another website, the link has to be included in the submission. Information based on books is acceptable, as long as the article is not a direct copy of the book article. We cannot accept text taken directly from websites of medical companies, or any other websites, unless explicit written permission has been obtained from said company or webmaster.

Links: All links submitted will be published as long as the links conform to the Policies and Procedures of this website. If links to documents and websites are readily available to the public, the link is acceptable. As an example, look at this article on Dr. Eric Muhe. The documents mentioned at the end of the article are freely available to the general public, so the link is acceptable. We recommend when necessary to use links to articles in this website. This improves readability and better standing in search engines.

Links to books, articles, and images that are available to the public under an open copyright and free-to-use are acceptable. We will review these links to make sure we do not infringe on copyright issues.

Images: Images submitted must be original or not be covered by copyright. All images will be resized to a maximum width of 250 pixels for the article (see example here). We will watermark all original images submitted by contributors with the words “Medical Terminology Daily”  or "Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc." unless they belong to someone else or are image links. If available, we can use imagery that belongs to Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc, or are available in books that are beyond copyright issues (over 75 years old and not republished). In the case of alternative large images that open when you click the smaller image, we use images that are 800 px wide. (See example here)

Cadaver images must be professional, respectful, and not show any identifying characteristics as to the individual who donated his/her body to science, nor as to the organization, university, or college where they were taken. Also, these images must follow the local regulations for the place where the images were taken.  Keep in mind the diverse audience of this blog, including age brackets!.